Missouri H593 and H630: Guns Everywhere

Bottom Line: H 593 and H 630 would change Missouri law to allow people to carry hidden, loaded handguns in Missouri schools, college and university facilities, and bars , along with daycare centers, sports arenas, and police stations. Lawmakers should put the safety of their communities first and reject the gun lobby’s dangerous “guns everywhere” agenda in Missouri.

H 593 and H 630 would allow people to carry hidden, loaded handguns in schools—despite opposition from school safety experts who know that doing so is unnecessary and unsafe.

  • Under current law, generally only trained law enforcement and security officers can carry concealed handguns in schools.§§ 571.030 R.S.Mo. (1)(1), 571.107 R.S.Mo. (1)(10). H 593 and H 630 would repeal this commonsense public safety law and allow civilians—including teachers—to carry hidden, loaded handguns in schools.
  • Teachers and school safety experts oppose allowing guns in schools. The American Federation of Teachers and the National Education Association, the nation’s two largest teachers’ organizations oppose allowing guns in schools.“AFT, NEA: Arming Teachers Won’t Keep Schools Safe, Dec. 20, 2012, available at: http://www.nea.org/home/53943.htm. The federal government’s chief legal, law enforcement, public health, education, and emergency management agencies all agree that allowing civilians to carry guns in schools is not a sound security practice.
  • Schools are already extremely safe. On average, only 1 percent of all homicides of school-age children occur on school grounds, on the way to or from school, or during a school sponsored event.Digest of education statistics, 2015. Table 228.10: School-associated violent deaths of all persons, homicides and suicides of youth ages 5-18 at school, and total homicides and suicides of youth ages 5-18, by type of violent death: 1993-93 to 2012-13. National Center for Education Statistics; http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d15/tables/dt15_228.10.asp. Accessed November 28, 2016. There is approximately one homicide of a school-age youth at school per 1.8 million enrolled students.Zhang, A., Musu-Gillette, L., and Oudekerk, B.A. (2016). Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2015 (NCES 2016-079/NCJ 249758). National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education, and Bureau of Justice Statistics, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. Washington, DC., at http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2016/2016079.pdf. Digest of education statistics, 2015. National Center for Education Statistics; date unknown. http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d15/tables/dt15_105.20.asp?current=yes. Accessed November 28, 2016. And “active shooter” incidents, like those at Sandy Hook School and Columbine High School, are extremely rare.Everytown for Gun Safety Support Fund, “School Shootings in America"

H 593 and H 630 would allow people—including violent criminals—to carry hidden, loaded handguns in college and university facilities, despite opposition from campus stakeholders and the potential for significant security and insurance costs.

  • Under current law, generally only trained law enforcement and security officers can carry concealed handguns in college and university facilities.§§ 571.030 R.S.Mo. (1)(1), 571.107 R.S.Mo. (1)(10). H 593 and H 630 would repeal this commonsense public safety law and allow civilians to carry hidden, loaded handguns in college and university facilities.
  • H 593 and H 630 would allow some violent criminals and people with no firearms safety training—who can already legally carry concealed handguns in certain public places—to do the same in Missouri college and university facilities.Senate Bill 656, enacted in September 2016, changed Missouri law to allow people recently convicted of violent misdemeanor crimes to carry concealed handguns in most public places.
  • Allowing guns on campus would burden Missouri colleges with large new costs for security and insurance. In 2014, Idaho passed legislation that forced colleges to allow people with “enhanced” permits to carry guns on campus. As a result, five state schools had to request more than $3.7 million from the state to increase security in the first year alone.Campus Safety Magazine, “Concealed Carry Law Costs Idaho Colleges $3.7M”, February 5, 2015, available at: http://www.campussafetymagazine.com/article/conceal_carry_law_costs_idaho_colleges_3.7m/Metal_Detection.
  • Campus stakeholders oppose guns on campus. Campus police chiefs,Thompson, Amy, et al. "Reducing firearm-related violence on college campuses—Police chiefs' perceptions and practices." Journal of American College Health 58.3 (2009): 247-254. college administrators and faculty,Price, James H., et al. "University Presidents’ Perceptions and Practice Regarding the Carrying of Concealed Handguns on College Campuses." Journal of American College Health 62.7 (2014): 461-469; Thompson, Amy, et al. "Faculty perceptions and practices regarding carrying concealed handguns on university campuses." Journal of community health 38.2 (2013): 366-373. and college studentsThompson, Amy, et al. "Student perceptions and practices regarding carrying concealed handguns on university campuses." Journal of American college health 61.5 (2013): 243-253. all overwhelmingly oppose guns on college campuses.
  • Colleges and universities, which have traditionally prohibited guns on campus, are relatively safe from gun violence.Carr, Joetta L. "Campus violence white paper." Journal of American College Health 55.5 (2007): 304-319, available at: http://curry.virginia.edu/uploads/resourceLibrary/white-paper.pdf But campus life is rife with other risk factors that make the presence of guns potentially dangerous—including heavy alcohol and drug use,Casa, N. C. "Wasting the best and the brightest: Substance abuse at America's colleges and universities." New York (US): Columbia University-National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (2007). and mental health issues and suicide.ACHA. National College Health Assessment: Spring 2015 Reference Group Executive Summary. American College Health Association;2015.

H 593 and H 630 would allow people to carry hidden, loaded handguns in bars—despite overwhelming public opposition and alcohol’s association with increased aggression.

  • Under current law, civilians cannot carry concealed handguns in Missouri bars.§§ 571.030 R.S.Mo. (1)(1), 571.107 R.S.Mo. (1)(7). H 593 and H 630 would repeal this commonsense public safety law and allow people to carry hidden, loaded handguns in bars.
  • The public strongly opposes guns in bars. Ninety-three percent of Americans think people should not be allowed to bring guns into bars.Hemenway, D., Azrael, D., & Miller, M. (2001). National attitudes concerning gun carrying in the United States. Injury Prevention, 7(4), 282– 285. Retrieved August 3, 2016 from http://bit.ly/2aNIpdA.
  • Alcohol is associated with increased aggression, and people under the influence of alcohol are both more likely to be shot and more likely to kill someone else. Alcohol intoxication increases the likelihood of violent behavior. Alcohol has detrimental effects on cognitive functioning, inhibits problem-solving abilities, and increases the likelihood of risk-taking, all of which are directly linked to aggressive behavior.Wilson, I. M., Graham, K., & Taft, A. (2014). Alcohol interventions, alcohol policy and intimate partner violence: a systematic review. BMC Public Health, 14, 881. Retrieved from http://bit.ly/2bgf0p0.
  • Alcohol use is associated with a higher likelihood of firearm victimization. Controlling for other factors, a case-control study in Philadelphia found that heavy drinkers were more than twice as likely to be shot in an assault as nondrinkers.Branas, C. C., Elliott, M. R., Richmond, T. S., Culhane, D. P., & Wiebe, D. J. (2009). Alcohol consumption, alcohol outlets, and the risk of being assaulted with a gun. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 33(5), 906–915. Retrieved from http://bit.ly/2avhx01.