Everytown’s research has shown that expanding the areas where guns can be carried and the circumstances in which they can be used is only associated with greater harm. So-called Stand Your Ground laws, which encourage the use of deadly force outside the home, are associated with significantly higher justifiable homicide rates. After Georgia passed its Stand Your Ground law, the number of justifiable homicides in the states increased by 83 percent. In Florida, it tripled. This push towards allowing easy access to guns in a growing variety of public places has only resulted in a greater risk of gun violence, often justified by increasingly permissive laws.

Guns in Public Places

guns in public places

Analysis of School Shootings

Everytown for Gun Safety and Moms Demand Action released a report documenting the school shootings that have taken place since Newtown.

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Prohibiting Guns at Public Demonstrations: Debunking First and Second Amendment Myths After Charlottesville

Eric Tirschwell, Litigation Director at Everytown for Gun Safety and Alla Lefkowitz, Everytown’s Deputy Director for Affirmative Litigation

Beyond Gridlock

This report answers President Obama’s call to action in the wake of the horrific shooting at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, Oregon, and offers five life-saving measures that the Administration could advance to keep guns out of the hands of dangerous people.

Shoot First

by Mayors Against Illegal Guns

In September 2013, Mayors Against Illegal Guns released Shoot First, a comprehensive review of Stand Your Ground laws and how they affect public safety and the criminal justice system. The report explains how Stand Your Ground statutes have expanded the circumstances in which people are allowed to use deadly force, and have created legal hurdles that make it harder to hold shooters accountable.

Amicus Brief: Norman v. State of Florida

Everytown for Gun Safety filed this amicus brief in the Florida Supreme Court to demonstrate that Florida's public-carry law - which permits concealed carry, but not open carry - does not violate the constitutional right to bear arms and is consistent with centuries of Anglo-American tradition.