Americans are 25 times more likely to be shot and killed with guns than people in other developed countries. This uniquely American problem can be addressed by evidenced-policies that have been shown to reduce crime, prevent gun violence, and save lives. By researching the patterns in gun violence in America and the holes in our laws that continue to allow dangerous people to get guns, we can further develop and improve the policies that will help save lives.

Gun Violence Trends

gun violence trends
22 Items
Fact Sheets Gun Violence Trends May 29, 2015

Firearm Technology and Vocabulary

To write or speak with legitimacy about guns, gun crime, and gun violence requires accurate use of terminology. This is a basic guide for describing firearms, accessories, and safety or regulatory technologies.
Fact Sheets Gun Violence Trends May 14, 2015

Law Enforcement Officers Shot to Death in 2013

by Everytown for Gun Safety and the Major Cities Chiefs Association

This fact sheet, published in collaboration between Everytown for Gun Safety Support Fund and the Major Cities Chiefs Association, analyzes the 25 incidents nationwide in which law enforcement officers were killed with guns that were not their own.
Reports Domestic Violence May 13, 2015

A Census of Domestic Violence Gun Homicides in Arizona

“A Census of Domestic Violence Gun Homicides in Arizona” reveals that 62 percent of women killed by intimate partners in Arizona were shot to death, and the rate of intimate partner gun homicides in Arizona is 45 percent higher than the national average.

Also featured in:  Gun Violence Trends  

Maps Unintentional Deaths April 30, 2015

#NotAnAccident Index

The U.S. has one of the highest reported rates of unintentional child gun deaths in the world. And Everytown research indicates that the number of incidents involving death and injury are significantly underreported.

Also featured in:  Gun Violence Trends  

Fact Sheets Background Checks April 16, 2015

Lessons from Missouri: the Cost of Eliminating Background Checks

For several decades, Missouri required every handgun buyer to pass a criminal background check and obtain a purchase permit. In 2007, the state dismantled its permit system and eliminated the background check requirement.