Americans are 25 times more likely to be shot and killed with guns than people in other developed countries. This uniquely American problem can be addressed by evidenced-policies that have been shown to reduce crime, prevent gun violence, and save lives. By researching the patterns in gun violence in America and the holes in our laws that continue to allow dangerous people to get guns, we can further develop and improve the policies that will help save lives.

Gun Violence Trends

gun violence trends
22 Items

#NotAnAccident Index

The U.S. has one of the highest reported rates of unintentional child gun deaths in the world. And Everytown research indicates that the number of incidents involving death and injury are significantly underreported.

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Memo on the Impact of Background Checks in Colorado

In July 2013, Colorado passed a new law requiring criminal background checks for all person-to-person gun sales, with reasonable exceptions for family, hunting, and self-defense. This memo provides the clearest picture to-date of how the expansion of the state’s background check system has improved public safety.

Also featured in:  Gun Violence Trends  

Beyond Gridlock

This report answers President Obama’s call to action in the wake of the horrific shooting at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, Oregon, and offers five life-saving measures that the Administration could advance to keep guns out of the hands of dangerous people.

Gun Violence and Background Checks in Oregon

This fact sheet brings together the findings of Everytown’s original investigations and analyses of relevant law enforcement and public health data to illuminate trends in gun violence and crime in Oregon.

Also featured in:  Gun Violence Trends  

Nevada Law Enforcement Deaths and Illegal Guns

Between January 1980 and October 2015, 15 law enforcement officers in Nevada were murdered in the line of duty with guns that were not their own. Everytown’s analysis of FBI data and press reports shows that more than half of these murders were committed by individuals who were likely barred by state or federal law from purchasing or possessing firearms.